Snoqualmie Falls Lumber Company Power Plant

Status: Still Standing

Year Listed: 2005

Location: King County

With its prominent brick smokestack rising 211 feet, the Snoqualmie Falls Lumber Company Plant is the primary remnant of what was once an extensive mill development, which included a company town of 5,000 residents. When the mill was constructed in 1917, it was the second, all-electric mill operation in the nation and the first of its kind to employ electric powered yarding, loading, and cutting operations in the woods.

Fort Walla Walla/Jonathan M. Wainwright Memorial VA Medical Center

Status: Still Standing

Year Listed: 2005

Location: Walla Walla County

The Jonathan M.Wainwright Memorial VA Medical Center (VAMC) is located on the grounds of what was once Fort Walla Walla, one of the oldest military posts established in the Pacific Northwest (1856-58). In 1921-22, the facility was converted for use as a hospital and came under the jurisdiction of what is now the U.S.Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Constructed between 1858 and 1906, the remaining historic buildings from the military era include the officers’ quarters, stable, and infantry barracks—among the oldest structures in the state. Additional buildings constructed in the 1920s and ‘30s for hospital use remain today.

Donovan District

Status: Still Standing

Year Listed: 2006, 2005

Location: Snohomish County

This local historic district of over 80 Cottage and Tudor style homes was built between 1925 and 1931 by Edward W. Donovan, a prominent local real estate entrepreneur. These modest but well-built structures answered the need for affordable single-family housing when Everett was growing in the 1920s, and they continue to serve this function today.

Camp Waskowitz

Status: Still Standing

Year Listed: 2005

Location: King County

Camp Waskowitz, home of Highline School District’s nationally recognized environmental education program, is the oldest outdoor school program in the country. In 1935, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) constructed the facility to serve as its base camp for Forest Service projects in the Snoqualmie Valley area. Out of more than 4,000 “temporary” CCC camps built nationwide, it is one of the few remaining that retains its original design integrity and “rustic utilitarian” feel.

Lone Star Cement Building

Status: Still Standing

Year Listed: 2006

Location: Skagit County

Constructed in the early 1920s, the Lone Star Office Building served as the administrative headquarters for the Superior Cement Industrial Complex. This enterprise, once the largest concrete manufacturer in Washington and one of the largest in the country, greatly influenced the development of the Town of Concrete while playing a significant role in construction projects across the state.

Fort Steilacoom

Status: Still Standing

Year Listed: 2006

Location: Pierce County

Established in 1848, Fort Steilacoom is one of the earliest sites with an official US presence in Washington Territory. By 1860, over a dozen structures were present at Fort Steilacoom. Four of these buildings survive: cottages constructed from 1858-59 and used as hospital wards and living quarters for medical staff.

McReavy House

Status: Still Standing

Year Listed: 2007

Location: Mason County

Constructed in 1890, the McReavy House is a Victorian mansion sitting atop a hill in Union overlooking the Hood Canal.  Believed to be one of the earliest extant houses on the canal, it was home to John McReavy.  McReavy prospered as the principal lumberman on Hood Canal from 1870-1893, served in the Territorial Legislature, and was a signer of Washington’s Declaration of Statehood.  McReavy played a key role in Union City’s development and was engaged in the construction of the hotel, wharf, sawmill, store, Masonic Lodge and church.  The panic of 1893 left McReavy only his house.

John A. Finch Boy Scout Lodge

Status: Still Standing

Year Listed: 2007

Location: Pend Oreille County

A donation of 80 acres at Diamond Lake to the Spokane Council of the Boy Scouts of America by publisher William Cowles lead to the establishment of Camp Cowles in 1920.  Three years later, with funding from Spokane mining magnate John A. Finch, a lodge serving as a dining hall and camp headquarters was constructed.  Spokane architect Julius Zittel drew up the plans, employing a rustic design appropriate to the lodge’s role as a center for Scouting activities.  Although the building has witnessed some alterations over the years, the original form and much of the interior remains intact and the lodge stands as the oldest known architect-designed Boy Scout Lodge west of the Mississippi.

Hastings Buildings

Status: Still Standing

Year Listed: 2007

Location: Port Townsend, Jefferson County

Ask Washington residents which city in their state is most noteworthy for its Victorian-era architecture and the answer will likely be Port Townsend.  The downtown commercial center boasts one of the state’s finest collections of late nineteenth century commercial structures, comprising a historic district recognized as a National Historic Landmark.  Located at the corner of Water and Taylor Streets, the Hastings Building serves as the anchor to Port Townsend’s historic downtown.  Constructed in 1889 and named for Captain L.B. Hastings, the architectural details and ornamentation adorning the Hastings Building illustrate the flamboyance and optimism of the early 1890s.

Day Block

Status: Still Standing

Year Listed: 2009

Location: Columbia County

Despite its storied history and role in Dayton’s development, deferred maintenance has taken its toll on the building. The second floor has been vacant since the 1950s and, in part because of a partial roof collapse in December of 2008, the commercial space on the ground floor is now vacant as well. Failure to address the needed repairs and continued exposure to the elements could potentially result in a case of demolition by neglect. At present, the Day Block is neither for sale nor for rent.

BF Tabbott House

Status: Still Standing

Year Listed: 2009

Location: Kitsap County

Counter to the objectives of the Overlay District as defined in the Comprehensive Plan, on May 14th the city’s planning commission approved a proposal to demolish the BF Tabbott House, replacing it with a mixed-use project that would combine residential and commercial uses on the site. This decision was based in part on an independent legal analysis that the Ericksen Avenue Overlay District, while designed to preserve the area’s historic character, does not specifically prohibit demolition of the historic resources located therein. The design guidelines in place for the Overlay District do allow conversion of the historic single-family structures to non-residential use, but require new additions to be made toward the rear of the existing buildings.With the recent planning commission decision, the fear is that more property owners will simply opt to demolish historic structures within the Overlay District rather than work to retain the historic character by implementing development programs that utilize the existing buildings.As for the BF Tabbott House, one of the more intact structures along Ericksen Avenue, the remaining hope is that someone interested in relocating the house will come forward.

McNeil Island

Status: Still Standing

Year Listed: 2011

Location: Pierce County

Ezra Meeker first settled on McNeil Island in 1853, establishing an agricultural and logging community. The land claim was sold and exchanged hands several times over the next couple of decades when, in 1870, 27 acres were donated to allow for the establishment of a territorial prison, which opened in 1875. Officially becoming a federal prison in the early 1900s, the facility became a Washington State prison in 1981 under the jurisdiction of the State Department of Corrections (DOC). Facing tremendous budget shortfalls, the state has closed the general prison facility on the island. The multi-agency jurisdictional responsibilities include DOC, the Department of Fish & Wildlife (whose interests include retaining the island as a wildlife preserve), and the Department of Social & Health Services (which currently operates the Special Commitment Center constructed in the 1990s). Complicating matters are deed restrictions put in place when the federal government turned the property over to the state in the 1980s. In the meantime, over fifty structures related to the operation of the prison facility remain on site, their future uncertain (a handful of residences are already slated for demolition).

Blaine Depot

Status: Still Standing

Year Listed: 2012

Location: Whatcom County

The first train pulled up to the Blaine Depot in 1909, providing a secondary means of accessing a city primarily served by maritime vessels until that time. The depot played an important role in exporting the region’s resources and aiding in its economic growth. Vacant for the past 6 years, the Blaine Depot has been determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Responding to community concern, BNSF recently shelved demolition plans, allowing time to assess alternative scenarios. One idea gaining steam is to return passenger rail service to the City of Blaine. The plan is acquiring supporters, including the Cascadia Center for Regional Development and the City of Surrey, British Columbia. Failing the return of passenger service, a second plan under consideration would relocate the depot to serve as an anchor attraction at a nearby waterfront park.

Bureau of Reclamation Headquarters

Status: Still Standing

Year Listed: 2012

Location: Yakima County

In 1908, the United States Reclamation Service (USRS) constructed the Sunnyside Headquarters Building to serve the Sunnyside Division of the Yakima Irrigation Project. Presently, the building stands as the most intact remaining structure associated with early twentieth century efforts to irrigate the Yakima Valley. The Sunnyside Canal irrigation system was purchased by the USRS in 1906, and the Sunnyside Division became the first division of the nearly 500,000 acre Yakima Project. Currently owned by the Sunnyside Community Hospital, the building faced demolition in order to clear the way for construction of a new student health center. Responding to community concerns over the proposed demolition, the hospital, working with the school district, identified a new site for the health center. The reprieve may only be temporary, as other proposals for the site may soon be considered. The Sunnyside Historical Museum is currently working with the hospital on plans to relocate the Reclamation Building to a nearby site in the downtown area.

Post Hospital

Status: Still Standing

Year Listed: 2012

Location: Clark County

The Post Hospital at the Fort Vancouver National Historic Reserve, significant as a fine example of military architecture from the early twentieth century, reflects innovation in medical practices and philosophies, particularly concerning X-ray technology and with the treatment of tuberculosis. Several environmental factors contribute to various issues that threaten the existence, structural integrity, and sustainability of the Post Hospital, which sits unoccupied. Most notably is its proximity to Interstate 5 and the associated air and noise pollution, exposure to acid rain resulting from traffic pollution mixing with rain, and direct sun exposure on the west side of the building. The most significant pending threat to the Post Hospital, however, is the construction of the Columbia River Crossing slated to begin in 2014. This important national infrastructure project will widen I-5 and place the interstate wall within 4 to 6 feet of the northwest corner of the Post Hospital Building. Officials with the Fort Vancouver National Historic Reserve hope the efforts in place to mitigate these threats will be successful, allowing the implementation of an envisioned community arts center in the building.

Oysterville Historic District

Status: Still Standing

Year Listed: 2014

Location: Pacific County

Founded in 1854, Oysterville is located in southwest Washington on the western shore of Willapa Bay, where an abundant source of oysters supported a booming shellfish industry. Oysterville’s population peaked at about 900 residents in the 1870s. Today, a fine collection of mostly painted-wood, clapboard and shiplap sided structures with distinctive period architectural details remains, including two excellent examples of carpenter gothic farmhouses. Collectively, the historic structures dating from as early as the 1850s comprise a National Register Historic District. The success of the historic district has created challenges, however, as the idyllic setting and small town feel has drawn a comparatively high volume of new construction within the district. Though a local Design Review Board is in place to ensure new buildings are compatible with the surrounding historic character, some integrity has been lost. Complicating matters, Pacific County, which has jurisdiction over the district, has been unwilling to intervene in instances where property owners have bypassed the required review process. Those concerned with the long term integrity of the district hope to see the county
play a larger role in helping to support historic preservation in Oysterville.

Cascade Workers’ Cottages

Status: Still Standing

Year Listed: 2017

Location: King County

In the last decade, Seattle’s South Lake Union neighborhood has transformed into a tech and biomedical hub. As full city blocks are built out for both office and housing needs, buildings constructed a century ago are vanishing or being consumed by development. Three workers cottages dating from 1911, collectively referred to as the Cascade Workers’ Cottages, are nearly all that remains of the years when Seattle’s Cascade neighborhood was evolving into an early industrial hub for the city. Characterized by their modest size and design, buildings in the area reflected the working roots of the early tenants, which in the case of the worker’s cottages included a paint spray operator employed at the nearby Ford Motor Company and an elevator operator at Smith Tower.

The three cottages have since been combined into one building and alterations over the years have ultimately rendered the structures ineligible for local landmark designation. Advocates believe, however, that the cottages do still convey the early history of the Cascade neighborhood and are crucial to retain. The struggle to balance new development without erasing the past remains ongoing in South Lake Union.