Donovan District

Status: Still Standing

Year Listed: 2006, 2005

Location: Snohomish County

This local historic district of over 80 Cottage and Tudor style homes was built between 1925 and 1931 by Edward W. Donovan, a prominent local real estate entrepreneur. These modest but well-built structures answered the need for affordable single-family housing when Everett was growing in the 1920s, and they continue to serve this function today.

Washington’s Historic Barns

Status: SAVED!

Year Listed: 2006

Washington’s barns are historically significant for their association with broad patterns of agricultural history and community development and as examples of distinct architectural styles and methods of construction. Over 50 barns across the state are currently designated as local landmarks or listed in the National or State Registers.

Stephenson House

Status: Lost

Year Listed: 2006

Location: King County

Members of the pioneering Stephenson family constructed the farmhouse in 1889. Despite some additions, the structure retains its original ‘T-shape’ form and massing, while other elements of the original design, such as the vergeboards and decorative shingles, remain intact.

National Guard of Washington Armory

Status: In the works!

Year Listed: 2006

Location: Bellingham, Whatcom County

Built in 1910, the heavy masonry walls, crenellated parapet and rounded towers distinguish the Washington National Guard Armory as a site for military training. Both the National Guard and the Army Reserve used the facility full-time until 1953, when reduced training schedules allowed the National Guard to convert the main floor into a public roller-skating rink. In 1972 the National Guard sold the Armory to Western Washington University which used the upper and lower floors for storage and continued leasing the main drill hall as a roller rink. This lease ended in 1989 after water damage to the oak flooring became a cost issue for the university.

The 2006 addition of the Armory to the Washington Trust’s Most Endangered list was instrumental in raising awareness and interest amongst the university’s Board of Trustees, who were resolved to see the Armory preserved. In 2009, in part through advocacy and assistance provided by the Washington Trust, Director of Facilities Management Tim Wynn, a long-time advocate for the building, was successful in obtaining funding for stabilization, roof repair, and completion of hazardous material abatement.

In June 2018, the building and the adjacent site were purchased by Curt O’Connor and Pete Dawson who are anxious to put this historic community asset back to use. They are currently working on adaptive reuse ideas for the structure and ideas for new construction on the adjacent site.

For more information about the building’s history, see “A History of the Bellingham National Guard Armory.”

Lone Star Cement Building

Status: Still Standing

Year Listed: 2006

Location: Skagit County

Constructed in the early 1920s, the Lone Star Office Building served as the administrative headquarters for the Superior Cement Industrial Complex. This enterprise, once the largest concrete manufacturer in Washington and one of the largest in the country, greatly influenced the development of the Town of Concrete while playing a significant role in construction projects across the state.

LaFramboise Farmstead

Status: SAVED!

Year Listed: 2006

Location: Yakima County

Located on land originally owned by the Moxee Land Company, the farmstead consists of four buildings: an 1885 church; a 1902 farmhouse and a c. 1902 barn; and a c. 1910 storage shed. By 1897 the church had been converted into a blacksmith shop. Antoine LaFramboise, a French-Canadian immigrant, began working in the shop that year and later purchased it, eventually constructing the additional buildings on the site. The National Register listed LaFramboise farmstead remains in the family today.

Kelley Farm

Year Listed: 2006

Location: Pierce County

The Kelley Farm sits on the site of one of the earliest Donation Land Claims in eastern Pierce County: 160 acres given to Reuben Ashford Finnell in 1853. Finell abandoned this claim, which William Barton Kelley purchased in 1864 along with 40 additional acres. The Kelley Farm also has pre-pioneer significance as the site is located along the historic Naches Trail. The configuration of the present farm includes a c. 1910 farmhouse, a smaller residence, a barn and six additional outbuildings spread over a 50-acre parcel.

Local advocates nominated the farm to the Most Endangered list over fear of inappropriate development plans proposed for the site. Recognizing the historic value of the location, however, the owners opted to highlight the site’s significance and market its historic importance. Today, the Kelley Farm serves as a spectacular events venue, featuring a restored barn, main house, and several outbuildings. Learn more about the Kelley Farm.

Howard S. Wright House

Status: SAVED!

Year Listed: 2006

Location: Everett, Snohomish County

Located in Everett’s Grand District, the Howard S. Wright House has been described as a fine example of the Classic Box. Howard S. Wright, founder of the Howard Wright construction company noted in the Puget Sound region and beyond as the main builder for the Seattle World’s Fair buildings, including the Space Needle, built the house in 1905.

By 1961, the house had been divided into eight apartments. A fire destroyed the roof in 2002, and fighting the fire caused water damage throughout. It was nominated in 2006 and the next year, Bill Belshaw, a local resident and board member with Historic Everett, purchased the house and rolled up his sleeves. Belshaw completely restored and updated the house, turning it into five condominiums. The house was listed on the Everett Register of Historic Places in November of 2012.

Once neglected, historic Everett house shines again” – HeraldNet, Novemebr 20, 2012

Fort Steilacoom

Status: Still Standing

Year Listed: 2006

Location: Pierce County

Established in 1848, Fort Steilacoom is one of the earliest sites with an official US presence in Washington Territory. By 1860, over a dozen structures were present at Fort Steilacoom. Four of these buildings survive: cottages constructed from 1858-59 and used as hospital wards and living quarters for medical staff.

First United Methodist Church

Status: Lost

Year Listed: 2006

Location: Pierce County

Frederick Heath, a prominent architect in Tacoma, was involved in designing First United Methodist to accommodate 1,150 people, making it one of the largest sanctuaries in the Northwest at the time of its completion in 1916. In addition to holding worship services, the church served as a hospital during a flu epidemic and as a community meeting hall, hosting speakers such as William Jennings Bryan and Clarence Darrow. First United is one of a cluster of historic churches in Tacoma’s Hilltop Neighborhood that, collectively, provide a richly layered narrative about the social and economic development of Tacoma.